Worlds Unimagined

ianbrooks:

Street Lit

Putting a message on a wall can be a much more effective way to reach the masses than expecting them to go find a book and learn it themselves. Some men just want to watch the world learn, regardless of medium. This collection of street arts details some memorable lines from famous books, hit the pictures to see which author and title, if you didnt already recognize them immediately.

(via: BuzzFeed)

"Averno" by Louise Glück

1.

You die when your spirit dies.
Otherwise, you live.
You may not do a good job of it, but you go on –
something you have no choice about.

When I tell this to my children
they pay no attention.
The old people, they think –
this is what they always do:
talk about things no one can see
to cover up all the brain cells they’re losing.
They wink at each other;
listen to the old one, talking about the spirit
because he can’t remember anymore the word for chair.

It is terrible to be alone.
I don’t mean to live alone –
to be alone, where no one hears you.

I remember the word for chair.
I want to say — I’m just not interested anymore.

I wake up thinking
you have to prepare.
Soon the spirit will give up –
all the chairs in the world won’t help you.

I know what they say when I’m out of the room.
Should I be seeing someone, should I be taking
one of the new drugs for depression.
I can hear them, in whispers, planning how to divide the cost.

And I want to scream out
you’re all of you living in a dream.

Bad enough, they think, to watch me fall apart.
Bad enough without this lecturing they get these days
as though I had any right to this new information.

Well, they have the same right.

They’re living in a dream, and I’m preparing
to be a ghost. I want to shout out

the mist has cleared –
It’s like some new life:
you have no stake in the outcome;
you know the outcome.

Think of it: sixty years sitting in chairs. And now the mortal spirit
seeking so openly, so fearlessly –

To raise the veil.
To see what you’re saying goodbye to.
.

Read More

Rebloggable by request: Write People.

neil-gaiman:

Hi Mister Gaiman! I’m a young, 22 year old writer currently working on a novel that I intend to feature a strong, female lead; however, as a male, I often find myself out of my element. I was wondering if you had any suggestions—are there any books/authors you might recommend that you feel write strong females rather well? Preferably in the sci-fi and/or fantasy genres. Thanks!

I don’t know how to answer this, other than, go and talk to women. There are lots of books you can read with strong women characters but ten minutes talking to a woman will give you more than you’ll get from a hundred books, whether the books are written by men or by women.

Talk to them about what they like and don’t like about the way they are represented in fiction. Talk about hopes and dreams.  Ask any interesting but embarrassing questions you’ve ever wanted to ask but were too male or too shy or too sensible to ask. 

And then, when you’ve done all that, remember that the most important thing to do is to write people who feel like people, and that women are people.

(Also, find out what the Bechdel test is. It is your friend.)

myjetpack:


My new book of cartoons “You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack” is out now. Details are here.

myjetpack:

My new book of cartoons “You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack” is out now. Details are here.

"To JK Rowling, from Cho Chang" by Rachel Rostad.

(This poem has stirred up some controversy; you can find the poet’s response to the controversy here.)

One Day It’s | Wayne Dodd

these-summer-nights-in-december:

image

One Day It’s | Wayne Dodd


Tuesday
and next thing you know

it’s Monday again. Some people never
sleep. At least that’s how they

remember it. “I was awake all night”
she says, he says. Either way,

it’s the same story: Life’s
a blur, even with improved glasses.

“What could I have been thinking?”
you wonder now, all those irreversibles

lining up outside your window like witnesses
at a hanging.

“What’s the matter with you people?”
you want to shout. “Get a life!”

But of course it’s your
life we’re thinking about here,

isn’t it? a life lived mostly
on the edges (notice the browning

and crackling there, the undeniable loss
of integrity.) Did someone

ask a question? Not really.
That’s just the sound

of wind in the trees,
always on its way

to somewhere else.



~

Hamilton Stone Review

odditiesoflife:

Recycled Animal Art

Driven by a combination of her passion for fitting odd shapes together and a sympathy toward discarded objects, Japanese artist, Sayaka Ganz creates animals from thrift store plastics. She only select objects that have been used and discarded. She believes the best way for artists to help reduce waste is to show how beautiful the materials can be and what can be done with them.


“You are now watching the throne, don’t let me get in my zone.”

“You are now watching the throne, don’t let me get in my zone.”

thebluthcompany:

The Moment of Bluth. Arrested Development Entertainment Weekly Covers 

[via]

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH

"A Morris Dance" by Mary Jo Salter

Across the Common, on a lovely May
day in New England, I see and hear
the Middle Ages drawing near, 
bells tinkling, pennants bright and gay—
    a parade of Morris dancers. 

One plucks a lute. One twirls a cape. 
Up close, a lifted pinafore
exposes cellulite, and more. 
O why aren’t they in better shape, 
    the middle-aged Morris dancers? 

Already it’s not hard to guess
their treasurer—her; their president—him; 
the Wednesday night meetings at the gym. 
They ought to practice more, or less, 
    the middle-aged Morris dancers. 

Short-winded troubadours and pages, 
milkmaids with osteoporosis—
what really makes me so morose is
how they can’t admit their ages, 
    the middle-aged Morris dancers. 

Watching them gamboling and tripping
on Maypole ribbons like leashed dogs, 
then landing, thunderously, on clogs, 
I have to say I feel like skipping
    the middle-aged Morris dancers. 

Yet bunions and receding gums
have humbled me; I know my station
as a member of their generation. 
Maybe they’d let me play the drums, 
    the middle-aged Morris dancers.

——

You can listen to the poet read the poem in her own voice here.

theremina:

(via)

catbushandludicrous:

Shoo. Shoo!

neil-gaiman:

Caddisfly larvae build protective cases using materials found in their environment. Artist Hubert Duprat supplied them with gold leaf and precious stones. This is what they created.http://www.utaot.com/ Mysteries, science, art and spirit. 

neil-gaiman:

Caddisfly larvae build protective cases using materials found in their environment. Artist Hubert Duprat supplied them with gold leaf and precious stones. This is what they created.

http://www.utaot.com/ Mysteries, science, art and spirit.
 

THIS SHOW.

This may be the single most beautiful post on tumblr.